Quality Steam Tractor! – 3/4″ Maxitrak Allchin

It’s been a while since my last update; as usual life has its way of taking over!

I wanted to post however to update on my recent Christmas present – for myself (which I’ve unboxed from the packaging before December mind you!).

I recently purchased a Maxitrak Allchin; this is a 3/4 inch scale live steam model prototype based off a real-life example built by Allchin in the well-known “Globe” steam works, way back in 1893.

This is the first live steam model I’ve purchased in a LONG while, my last was a Wilesco traction engine way back in 2011 (or was it earlier?). Until this point my live steam model collection consisted of two Wilescos (both of which I believe I have blogged about in the past on this very blog): one steam roller, and the aforementioned tractor. For a period of time in the recent past, I had been lusting over the quality D.R. Mercer engines, however I couldn’t quite bring myself to purchase one. It was only recently that I became aware of the Allchins, and after hearing them run in various videos on YouTube, I became hooked with just how realistic they sounded! And after hearing this thing run first-hand, I must say, it seems like the Maxitrak Allchin is probably the most realistic-sounding live steam model in the 3/4 – 1″ scale bracket (and price range!).

So yes, I’ve only had this model for just over a week and I must say, WOW, I am so glad I held out for this! It’s certainly a steam engine and a half, and for what you pay (about 875 GBP/$1,600 AUD in my case), it’s certainly good value for money. Some of its features include:

  • Quality silver-soldered boiler rated to 60 PSI (includes boiler test certificate to 150 PSI)
  • Realistic design and liveries
  • Forward/reverse valve gear lever (with working Stevenson’s Valve Gear arrangement)
  • Boiler pressure gauge
  • Boiler water level sight glass
  • Quality butane gas tank and burner (again with a test certificate)
  • Solid rear axle driving both rear wheels
  • Spoked wheels with rubber tyres
  • Wonderful paint finish and overall quality/fitment of parts

Customs ‘issues’

Importing an item of this type and value always poses risks, and particularly so with Australia’s (overly?) protective Customs agency, however after a whole week of being laid-up at the destination airport and approximately $300 worth of duty and taxes later, the Allchin was mine! I must commend DHL on their handling of the shipment along with management of the Customs requirements. In the end I had agreed that the item was NOT for commercial use, and that it was essentially, in DHL’s words “a prototype only, for demonstration purposes”….all of which is essentially true. All told I am happy that I ended up gaining possession of this fine model, especially given how much I had spent on it!

Un-boxing!

The un-boxing process is always fun and I’ve documented here at the bottom of this post, in a series of photos which I hope you will enjoy. The model came VERY well-packaged and I must also thank Maxitrak/Maidstone Engineering for their awesome customer service and handling of my order. They replied to all my emails promptly and were always on-hand to assist with my queries.

Included together with the tractor inside my package, were some additional bits and pieces which I ordered (and I even received a 20% discount on these additional items!). The additional bits consisted of:

  • A “starter kit” (consisting of water/oil syringes, long-nose lighter and a 200ml bottle of quality steam oil
  • A “plate set” (several quality-machined metal plates and number plates, including a boiler “wash out” plate
  • A “gas valve adapter” which enables fitment to screw-top butane gas canisters

All these parts came neatly and safely packaged inside the box which arrived as part of my shipment. I will let the photos do the talking below, but the packaging of the actual tractor itself was very-well handled too, and the model was securely mounted on a sturdy wooden plate with metal straps securing the rear wheels. A large amount of foam was also used to cushion the model from the rigours of shipping that it was bound to have encountered on its long journey from Kent, UK to Perth, Australia.

Fuel woes?

It’s worth mentioning that this model runs on BUTANE gas. Not something I was extremely familiar with until now; so, you could imagine how I was more than a little nervous with how I was going to go about running this machine let alone acquire the required gas from local stores/outlets. Rest assured, I have managed to overcome any hurdles associated with running the butane fuel and I have since found a store which supplies the fuel in reasonable quantities.

For those living in Australia who may be reading this, PLEASE ensure you purchase screw-top butane gas canisters if you wish to run this model; the more-prevalent (and unfortunately cheaper) “push-in” type canisters are not particularly useful with this model, unless you can get your hands of a suitable plastic adapter, or otherwise if the included gas nozzle is long-enough to fit down into the recess of the gas filler. For best peace of mind however, simply purchase a screw-top butane canister, and use Maxitrak’s gas valve adapter (email Maxitrak for this), and you should be all set! As a side-note, most Bunnings outlets sell the “Primus” butane screw-top canisters in their “Tool shop”, so the fuel is quite readily available.

Having been used to running Esbit fuel tablets for all of my live steam model experience so far, I must say that the butane gas fuel is very clean and much more trouble-free. The only thing is, the wife doesn’t approve of running it in the house unlike my Wilescos which will easily (and much more quietly!) run in the house all day without much issue. The smell from the Esbits aren’t particularly pleasant either, however given the more “realistic” nature of the Allchin, and the fact that it runs at higher pressures and likely higher temperatures, it certainly doesn’t lend itself well to running inside as well as a more ‘toy-like’ Wilesco. In short, the Allchin smells, sounds and behaves (with all its hissing and popping and smoking) like a REAL steam tractor! Just note, you will most likely need to run it outside…haha…

Fire in the hole!

Before running any live steam model, it’s necessary first build up a head of steam pressure in the boiler. It’s assumed that you, careful reader, are somewhat familiar with the workings of a steam engine so I won’t go fully in the details here, lest to say that you basically need a) water, b) fire and c) oil, to run a steam engine successfully. And NEVER run out of water if you can help it!! No scratch that, NEVER run out of water PERIOD!

The process of fuelling-up the butane gas tank on this tractor is straightforward – simply fit the gas valve to the screw-top canister, invert, and press firmly onto the gas valve on the tractor’s gas tank. After only about 30 seconds, you have a tank-full of gas ready to last approximately 20 minutes (about one run). From there, run through the usual preparation process of adding water to the boiler – reference the sight glass – no need to fill more than 3/4 full – (about 3.5 syringes full if using the supplied water-filling syringe), re-fit the safety valve, add steam oil to the lubricator, lubricate the valve gear and other moving parts with ordinary car engine oil, check the free moment of all parts, set mid-gear on the reversing lever, close the regulator and light the fire!

You are rewarded with a satisfying “WHOOSH” as you light the fire on this engine, and it is here that you must apply particular caution, as careless (and glove-less) fingers can get burnt if not careful. Lighting the fire consists of holding the open flame from the long-nose lighter under the front of the smoke box (immediately above the front axle) and twisting the gas valve open slightly until you hear the flame take hold. Gloved hands and a long-nose lighter are definitely recommended here! It is also possible to light the flame by removing the smoke box lid first, however this way is a little more cumbersome.

Once the fire is going, the ferocity of the flame can be easily controlled by using the gas valve on the gas tank of the tractor. When everything is still cold however (including the burner), the control of the burner setting is a little more crude, and you need to add a little more gas to keep the fire going, but it must be said that avoiding too high a heat when the machine is still cold is a good idea, to prevent any shock heating. After a moment or two, once the burner has settled to a nice toasty medium and the machine itself gets warm, you can further adjust the burner setting as required and you can generally reduce the gas valve setting back down towards the ‘off’ position and keep it there for the entire run (unless you intend on pulling particularly heavy loads!). At this setting, I’ve found that the gas will easily outlast the water in the boiler and extreme caution must be taken to ensure one does not run out of water before the fire, lest the expensive boiler gets damaged!

Side-note: so far I have been running the gas tank on the minimum setting, and the boiler gauge always seems to creep up to its rated 60 PSI limit before the safety valve begins popping off – this is even whilst operating in-gear with the tractor towing a scale load (a Wilesco tractor in my case!). There is an air intake adjustment on the burner however, so I may try tweaking this so that the burner produces less heat on the minimum setting; this may entail running the burner “richer” perhaps.

Running the machine!

So! What’s it like running this beast? Well, as aforementioned in the paragraph above, the Allchin DEFINITELY offers a more “realistic” steaming experience, and it certainly sets itself apart from the more “toy-like” steam engines, such as the Wilescos and perhaps the Mamods (the latter of which I have no experience with), so respect is definitely required here when running this machine – although this could be said of any live steam model. We have boiling water, steam and in most cases, live flames at play, so be careful!

With all that said, the Allchin is an absolute PLEASURE to run. I have been running timed trials and so far each run consists of about 15-20 minutes of pure steaming pleasure. This time excludes the 5-6 minutes that it takes to actually build steam as well.

Once the steam pressure has begun to rise and the steam gauge begins to register, engage forward (or reverse!) on the reversing lever, open the regulator slightly and give the flywheel a few helping turns…after a few rotations (there is almost always a few seconds required whilst the engine clears itself of any condensate) the engine will begin running on its own and you will hear that characteristic “chuff-chuff” sound begin!

It is generally here that I hit the “start” button on the stopwatch to begin keeping time of the run. I’ve found doing this to be very important, as you’ll read on shortly.

After running this way in neutral for a few minutes, I will engage the gears of this fine machine and begin driving. It certainly drives very smoothly, and doesn’t exhibit any of the cheap-ish sounding “clanging” and “tinking” sounds that the cheaper toy live steam models may exhibit. The motion runs very smooth and with very little play in the parts. This all contributes to the model sounding very nice indeed.

My only slight dislike with this model is the fact that it has a solid rear axle, with no differential. Most models have either a single-driving rear wheel, or (in the case of the more expensive models), an actual differential unit. Unfortunately the Allchin has none of the above, and combined with the high-grip rubber treads, this means that turns normally result in a bit of skidding and slipping from the rear wheels. Now, before I am taken the wrong way, this in no great way detracts from this model, and it may simply be the case of my model still being new and “tight”, but turns in the Allchin generally require a little more application of the steam regulator. I have actually read that there is a degree of “play” in the rear wheels, but from my experience so far, this isn’t a great amount. Nonetheless, turns can still be achieved, and at worst, they probably only involve a bit of scrubbing of the rubber tyres and little else.

I am actually grateful for the solid rear axle, as once you open the regulator up with a full head of steam, the amount of pulling power from the rears is something to be experienced to be believed. There are some out there that believe that this model pulls like the proverbial mule, and they are not wrong! I have no doubt that this model could pull along a small child or somewhat lean adult!

Keeping a stopwatch recording the run time (as aforementioned) comes in particularly handy, as the water sight glass can sometimes lie (or shock) when it suddenly drops in water levels reported. I generally get a good 15-20 minutes of actual run time from this model and from my limited experience so far, I’ve found that as soon as the water level begins to straddle the lower reaches of the gauge, it’s a good time to shut off that burner!

Believe me though, the temptation to keep running can sometimes be quite trying, but I’d rather play it safe than sorry. Running a boiler out of water is no fun and I’ve (thankfully) yet to experience such an event with any of my live steam models…and I intend to keep it that way!

One other thing to note is that this machine gets HOT during the run (about 150 degrees C on the sides of the boiler as measured by my digital temperature gauge), so gloved hands are a must, and I have also found that the regulator knob is quite stiff from the factory, and this knob gets ultra hot too (to the point of burning bits of clothed glove material off!), so for this, I have found that an old RC model wrench from my RC model car days has come in very handy indeed. You will see this wrench in the photos below – basically it allows me to fit it over the regulator knob and control the regulator easily using the wrench, so I avoid getting tinged, and I get slightly more leverage to twist the somewhat resistant knob as well (do exercise caution when closing up the regulator fully against its valve seat however – you do not want to damage it).

After-run procedures

Once the water has run low, and the burner is promptly shut-off, the tractor may run for another moment or two on residual steam pressure, and once the fine beast has run out of breath for another day, it’s time to cool her down and begin the process of cleaning up. This part of the run is actually quite therapeutic for me, and keeps me busy for easily another 30-60 minutes afterwards.

I will generally empty the boiler after a few moments of shut down (once all the steam pressure been exhausted that is!), to allow the boiler interior to dry from the residual heat and avoid any dampness from remaining. I will then keep the safety valve unfitted for several minutes to allow the boiler to air out, and begin wiping down the model to clean it.

I don’t particularly go to the lengths of keeping my engines in “showroom” cleanliness, but I don’t exactly like to keep them looking like they’ve just been run and tossed aside either! I guess I sit somewhere in between. At the end of the day though, I’m no stranger to a bit of spit and polish.

Photos!

Enough of the blabbering! Below is a gallery of photos of this fine Allchin. I do hope you enjoy!

IMAG0261 IMAG0262 IMAG0263 IMAG0264 IMAG0265 IMAG0266 IMAG0267 IMAG0268 IMAG0269 IMAG0270 IMAG0271 IMAG0272 IMAG0274 IMAG0278 IMAG0279 IMAG0280 IMAG0281 IMAG0282 IMAG0284 IMAG0285 IMAG0286 IMAG0287 IMAG0300 IMAG0301 IMAG0302 IMAG0309 IMAG0310 IMAG0312 IMAG0313 IMAG0314 IMAG0315 IMAG0316

 

LEGO – Fluid Drive Bus #6683 – It’s Alive!

So after several months of painstaking development and experimentation, my first (and hopefully not last?) fluid drive LEGO vehicle is now complete! I wasn’t certain whether or not I’d achieve this feat, of building a successfully, genuine, model of hydro-dynamic awesome-ness (if I may say so myself), but it seems I’ve done it and here it is!

For those interested in the ‘journey’ I’ve taken to get to this point, I’ve posted photos of the progress below, most of which you probably haven’t seen before. Unfortunately the earliest photo of the development I have, is from the 12 April 2014. It really is amazing how quickly things have moved, even though it has taken me about 6 months to complete this project. I can still remember the prototype chassis frame I ran through the house with a very early fluid coupling iteration. I wish I took photos back then! Oh well.

Of course, also included in this post are photos of the completed bus as it stands today.

‘In Progress’ Photo Gallery (Circa April-May 2014)

Dsc00841 Dsc00842 Dsc00843 Dsc00863 Dsc00864 Dsc00865 Dsc00866 Dsc00867 Dsc00868 Dsc00869 Dsc00870 Dsc00872

‘Complete’ Photo Gallery!

Dsc01007 Dsc01008 Dsc01040 Dsc01086 Dsc01087 Dsc01088 Dsc01089 Dsc01090 Dsc01091 Dsc01092 Dsc01096 Dsc01097 Dsc01098 Dsc01100 Dsc01101 Dsc01102 Dsc01103 Dsc01104 Dsc01105 Dsc01106 Dsc01107 Dsc01108 Dsc01109 Dsc01110 Dsc01111 Dsc01112 Dsc01115 Dsc01116 Dsc01117 Dsc01118 Dsc01120 Dsc01121 Dsc01123

Video!

PDF Operator’s Manual:

Click here to access the PDF Operator’s Manual

Next steps

So where to from here? Aside from the mountain-load of plastic model kit boxes which currently await me in my hobby room, I think the ‘LEGO bug’ has well and truly bitten (for better or worse!). Sooo…I’m thinking that next on the agenda may well be another LEGO bus! Whether to utilise the wonders of fluid-drive or not for next time remains yet to be seen however.

One example of a bus I am eyeing-off at the moment is the famous Greyhound/GMC Scenicruiser. The very earliest (prototype?) version of this bus had TWO engines, driving through a fluid coupling to a 3-speed transmission with a 2-speed auxiliary transmission behind that, offering 6 speeds in total. Building this in LEGO would certainly be my next challenge…and if I chose to model the prototype, I’d be putting in two LEGO motors and probably TWO fluid couplings to ensure I extract the maximum power from those motors. Or, I could choose to model the later, more prevalent models of the Scenicruiser which had a standard clutch and transmission. Boring?? Haha. Time will tell…but I will be sure to keep you all posted here on this blog! I will close with a photo of a real-life Scenicruiser…

scenicruiser

LEGO Pneumatic Tractor Mk1

So here it is finally!

Over a year ago, I managed to build myself a prototype pneumatic engine out of LEGO, after viewing some examples on the Internet. I was quite chuffed that my initial version worked so well, that I even posted a video about it. Then it seems, nothing happened for a while. Well really, it did, I just neglected to blog about it!! :( So, here it is, the main model which resulted from my dismantling the LEGO Unimog kit I had blogged about a while back.

Overview

So what exactly is a pneumatic engine you might ask? Well, a long time ago, Lego came up with the idea of incorporating pneumatic cylinders into their kits. These are basically cylindrical rams powered by low-level compressed air and were designed to operate kits with crane arms and other such creations. It seems however, that Lego builders around the world (me included) will always find ways to re-purpose these parts and thus, the pneumatic engine is born. Looking on the Internet, there are quite a few different types of these engines, some operating at crazy-high, Lego part-melting RPMs. Others (such as mine), operating at more ‘reasonable’ levels of speed, and boasting steam-engine-like levels of torque. In this post I’ll give a ‘teaser-like’ overview of the main points of the tractor, but I do hope that related documentation and assets, such as the video at the end of the post and also the images will be able to do some of the talking too.

Also, be sure to check out the detailed Operator’s Manual which I’ve written for this tractor!! (link at the bottom of this post also)

How the pneumatic engine works

I have, as aforementioned, already written a very in-depth operator’s manual regarding this tractor, and so here’s an excerpt from the manual, which I think describes the principles of the pneumatic engine best:

The engine operates because a flow of compressed air is directed to each of the two cylinders in a predetermined sequence. Once compressed air reaches the inside of the cylinder, it is directed to push against a piston, as it has nowhere else to go. Each piston in a cylinder is connected to the engine’s crankshaft, which is forced to revolve as the pistons move up and down. Finally, the crankshaft is connected to the Tractor’s transmission.
The engine can continue to run as compressed air flow to a given cylinder alternates as the piston in that cylinder moves up and down.

As the piston reaches the bottom of a cylinder, compressed air is routed to the bottom of the cylinder to push the piston upwards.
When the piston reaches the top of the cylinder, the compressed air is routed to the top of the cylinder, pushing the piston down, and the cycle repeats as long as compressed air is supplied.
This is referred to as the ‘double-acting’ or ‘double-action’ process.

The result is a continuous rotation of the engine crankshaft, which is directed to the transmission, which then feeds power to the rear wheels.

Other components and systems

I saw fit to load this tractor with as many systems and components as I could, being that I had quite a lot of parts left-over from the dismantling of the Unimog. So, here’s a short list of the systems and features of this tractor, in addition to the pneumatic engine (I’ll mention the engine again anyway ;)):

  • Two-cylinder double-acting, non-reversible, pneumatic engine – runs on air alone
  • Two-speed forward and one-speed reverse constant mesh gearbox
  • Automatic pneumatic parking brake featuring twin-brake shoe design
  • Drag link steering system
  • Rear differential
  • Rear pneumatic-operated ram (actuates various accessories)

The Operator’s Manual I’ve written describes these systems (and more) in much greater – almost exhaustive – detail. Be sure to check it out (link at the end of this post)!

Gallery

Here’s some pictures of the tractor as well as a video and a link to the very detailed Operator’s Manual. Enjoy!!

Dsc00846 Dsc00847 Dsc00848 Dsc00849 Dsc00851 Dsc00852 Dsc00854 Dsc00855 Dsc00856 Dsc00857 Dsc00858 Dsc00859 Dsc00861 Dsc00862 Levers

Link to the Operator’s Manual PDF

Where to now?

So what’s next at the Harman Motor Works? I am currently working on a remote-controlled Lego bus, to be based loosely off an AEC Regal MkIV single-decker. This Lego bus is fitted with my latest prototypical fluid drive coupling, of which I’ve also recently blogged about. I’m currently at a reasonably-advanced level of completion of this vehicle, having got the rolling chassis and box frame mostly complete. There is however still quite of bit of work to go. I will post an update or two on this blog over the coming weeks!

Here’s a sneak-peak at what the Harman Motor Works work-bench looks like at the moment:

whatsnext140420

Happy New Year! And a revival…of sorts…

Happy New Year  2014 all!

As usual, it’s been way too long since I’ve updated this blog. Many things happened in 2013, both blog-worthy and not (unfortunately), so I’ve got a bit of catching-up to do I fear.

One of my new year’s resolutions is to make sure I update this blog more often!

So, I thought I’d start this post with a bit of a rundown of the content you can expect to see on the blog this year:

1. More model kits! Yes, I have been building more model kits since the last update where I showed-off the Bussing 8000. Since the Bussing was completed six months ago, I have obtained no less than six kits which have promptly filled my study/hobby area, and I have so far completed two of those kits. Yes, the Harman Motor Works has its work cut out for it model kit-wise this year…and I intend to blog them all to within an inch of their plastic!

2. More Lego! Since having dismantled the Unimog kit, I have built (and completed) a brand new vehicle of my own design: a two cylinder pneumatic-engined tractor, using an engine I created as seen here in a video from over a year ago. Stay tuned for more info on that! (btw, I have also been dabbling in Lego robotics as of late, so you may come across a post or two detailing some of my creations on that front…I make no apologies for the any mind-bending robotic behaviour you may witness…)

3. More sim stuff! OK I will admit I have been a bit lax in updating this blog to align with my YouTube channel which has been updated a fair bit more frequently, mostly with simulation-related content. I will endeavour to have some posts up on this blog that will hopefully support those videos.

Again, thanks to all that are reading this (and have found this blog useful), I hope this year proves a successful one and here’s to more content!

P.S. Stay tuned: in keeping with the spirit of updating this blog regularly, I will very shortly have a new post up following this, that will showcase the latest model kit which I have just completed. What ever could it be?? More on that shortly!

Cheers.

Büssing 8000 S13 Massive Update! Project Complete?

It’s been too long, several months too-long in fact, since my last update on my Revell Büssing 8000 build. I’m glad to report however that the truck is 99.9% complete!! Why 99.9%? Well, in a way I could never really ‘complete’ something such as this; there’s always something more to ‘weather’ or ‘touch-up’! But for all intents and purposes, I’m happy to say it’s complete for now.

In the end I decided to leave the top panel of the hood (bonnet), roof and tarpauline (as well as the stanchion frames) unglued for quick and easy removal for a better look at the truck. Unfortunately, the roof panel is warped slightly and you may notice panel gaps in some of the pictures; had I glued this down this minor imperfection would not have been evident, but I chose to keep the roof ‘loose’ in order to better show off the interior as desired.

The final process in the build involved generous use of ‘MIG Productions’ weathering powder and I tried not to go overboard. I am quite happy with the final result though.

Pictures Tell a Thousand…

I’m happy to chalk this project up as ‘done’ for now and will let the utter boat (truck?)-load of images do the talking again for this post. Good thing too, as I have a pile of other projects waiting for that precious little space on my workbench. I will keep you posted as to what’s coming up the pipeline soon ;).

For now though, enjoy several month’s worth of progress on the Büssing (from January) up to present-day ‘completion’! (note: it was a difficult decision to choose which pictures made ‘the cut’ below as I had so many of them; I tried to capture a good variety of shots to tell the story). Also included below the images is a link to a quick video on my YouTube channel, HarmanMotor.

 

Büssing 8000 S13 Update

Here’s a post to show some updates on the Büssing 8000 model truck kit which has been DSC00193keeping me busy for the past several days. So far the build has progressed well. I won’t say it has been easy by any stretch, because it hasn’t; what it has been is challenging and definitely rewarding. Revell have themselves a masterpiece with this kit, I can already tell.

Growing pains

Overall the kit has gone together well so far, aside from some of the usual part fitment issues here and there (part and parcel of model kit building). But…

One of the more concerning stages in the build was putting together the fully functioning Knorr steering system: one of the key parts was broken/incomplete out-of-the-box, which meant I had to refabricate a new piece from a section of scrap plastic. This proved quite challenging (and fun) because the part I had to refab would also be a moving part (!) in the steering system.

Here’s some pictures of the refabrication process. There was a lot of buffing and filing down (as well as cursing) to do once I cut off my piece of virgin plastic from the sprue. In the end I made it though, and the piece was fitted and no one is the wiser (well, except for you since you’re reading this). I’ve included my finger in some of the shots, just to show the scale at which I am working…

DSC00103 DSC00107 DSC00108 DSC00116 DSC00117 DSC00122

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gallery

I’m devoting the rest of this post to a huge gallery of photos I’ve taken which shows the progress over the past week or so, and a link to a YouTube video I uploaded a little bit earlier. I can’t wait to finally get the chassis down pat, and then start work on the body itself.

 

Making Tracks

A quick blog post which may hint at my next big kit that I will be building (along with a hint from the end of my previous LEGO post here – can you guess?).

My dastardly-evil (just kidding) other half gave me this recently: kit 8259 with the chain-link treads which I was after (nyuh nyuh how did she know!?).

I rarely if ever build LEGO kits “to the letter”, preferring instead to dump the bits into my collection and go DIY (the most fun!), but I thought I’d give it a go this time around and here’s some quick pics of how that turned out.

Of course, the main thing of interest (for me at least) in this kit is the treads which will be used in my next big build.

There’s still more parts to acquire before I can truly get started, but stay tuned for more on that front soon! In the meantime, enjoy…

Two kits in one!
This is what I came for!
Misc parts
Complete!
The shovel can be raised and lowered
Didn't take long for the Gorilla Suit Guy...

Steam Rolling Stock

Model steam engines are actually quite cool if you’re a bit of a geek like me who’s into anything with a motor in it. Several different manufacturers of the things exist out there, such as Mamod, Wilesco and the much-revered Mercer line of models (read: $$$).

This post introduces you to the current Wilesco range of steam engines I’m lucky enough to possess.

I first picked up a Wilesco steam roller (D365) maybe two years ago now, and that was my first steam model. Since then I’ve acquired another Wilesco model, the D405 tractor.

In this blog I hope to keep you updated on all things model steam, where that be tractors, boats or stationary engines and anything else related to the wide world of steam engines, big and small.

Stay tuned for more posts soon which will go into more detail, but in the meantime enjoy the pics below which show off my current steam inventory…

D365 Steamroller
D365 Steamroller
D365 Steamroller
D405 Tractor
D405 Tractor
D405 Tractor